Beautiful Savior (Three In One)

 

Beautiful Savior (Three In One)


"In Isaiah 53, the prophet speaks of the physical appearance of the coming Christ - here’s what the NIV translation has to say: "He grew up before him like a tender shoot, and like a root out of dry ground. He had no beauty or majesty to attract us to him, nothing in his appearance that we should desire him."

Or here, from the Message: "The servant grew up before God—a scrawny seedling, a scrubby plant in a parched field. There was nothing attractive about him, nothing to cause us to take a second look. He was looked down on and passed over, a man who suffered, who knew pain firsthand. One look at him and people turned away."

While there are Scriptural references to Jesus that speak to his beauty, they have more to do with his divinity or are simply metaphor and poetry.

It’s funny, because if you’ve ever had a moment where you felt like you’d gazed upon Jesus, it was likely an overwhelming, tears-falling kind of experience that could only be described as transcendently beautiful. And so it follows that much of our poetry and song describe him in those terms. I, for one, grew up singing that Jesus was beautiful; countless modern worship songs use that language - including one of the classics from my own Enter the Worship Circle roots - you are beautiful my sweet sweet song!

One of my favorite hymns from my childhood in the Lutheran Church is “Beautiful Savior.” I included it on my latest record, “Mighty Refuge,” because I loved the melody and the Psalmic nature of the lyrics, describing the majesty of nature, one of the easiest subjects to write about in terms of beauty, and then proclaiming the surpassing qualities of the Savior.

It’s really a thrill to sing and I think part of that thrill and energy led me to continue within the rumblings of the creative process, through poetic free-versing, to write another song, one that begins to address God and nature in a more direct, personal way, describing a scene, telling a story. That all of creation is taking part in the merriment of Christ over, through, and around us. “Three In One,” as I’m calling it, ends with an exultation of the Trinity and brings to mind some of my favorite passages of C.S. Lewis in Perelandra where all of creation is gathered to celebrate the Lord and Lady coming into their reign, unspoiled by temptation. It’s just such a decadent party, and one that will be (and is) celebrated in those moments when we experience God first-hand.

The classic last verse of All Creatures of Our God and King is the final meditation on this track, a place of rest and simplicity after a flurry of words, emotion, and energy." (Aaron Strumpel)

BEAUTIFUL SAVIOR (THREE IN ONE)
Written by Aaron Strumpel (ASCAP)
© 2018 Common Hymnal (ASCAP), Thirsty Dirt Records (ASCAP) (admin by CapitolCMGPublishing.com)

VERSE 1
Beautiful savior, king of creation
Son of God and son of man
Truly I'd love thee, truly I’d serve thee
Light of my soul, my joy, my crown

VERSE 2
Fair are the meadows, fair are the woodlands
Robed in flowers of blooming spring
Jesus is fairer, Jesus is purer
He makes our sorrowing spirit sing

VERSE 3
Fair is the sunshine, fair is the moonlight
Bright the sparkling stars on high
Jesus shines brighter, Jesus shines purer
Than all the angels in the sky

VERSE 4
Beautiful savior, Lord of the nations
Son of God and son of man
Glory and honor, praise, adoration
Now and forevermore be thine

TAG
Stars, they shine, shine
Shine so bright, bright, bright
Bright like the sparks, sparks, sparks
Sparks in your eyes, eyes, eyes, eyes
And rivers they run, run
Run so clear, clear, clear
They fall like the tears, tears, tears
Tears of your joy, joy, joy, joy
The mountains they shout, shout
Shout to the sky, sky, sky
Their voices rise, rise, rise
Oh they make you smile, smile, smile
The people we sing, sing
Sing to you Father, Father, Father
Sing to you Son, Son, Son
Sing to you Spirit, Spirit, Spirit
Three in one

OUTTRO
Praise, praise the Father
Praise the Son
And praise the Spirit
Three in one

 
 
 
 

 

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